#tootired 2 make dinner / day 3 at work successful w visit from @ameliakate26 / gotta get down on #Friday

#tootired 2 make dinner / day 3 at work successful w visit from @ameliakate26 / gotta get down on #Friday

tootired friday

janetmock:

exoticfever:

This post is the ninth in a series of posts I am making about books by black authors who impacted me. (The other posts are below). Today’s book is Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love and So Much More by Janet Mock. I read this memoir earlier this year when it came out.  Janet Mock is a transgender woman and was formerly a staff editor at People magazine. A beloved presence on Twitter and in media, she is a trans rights activist and thinker. The memoir is courageous, detailing her earliest memories of knowing she was a girl/woman and her process towards transition. She discusses her experience with survival sex work in both the book and in a series of videos she released on YouTube when the book came out. She’s challenged laws and policies that target and criminalize trans people, sex workers and people of color, and is a force to be reckoned with on Twitter and in the media.  Her story also charts difficult but loving relationships she has had with family members, and the challenges she faced in her love life. Reading about her relationship with her partner and his journey towards accepting his love for her is especially heartening and eye-opening. Some of my favorite media appearances with her have been on those occasions where she and Orange is the New Black actress Laverne Cox (a genius and badass in her own right) have been brought on to speak together. Mock regularly speaks at conferences and events, and started the #girlslikeus hashtag to elevate issues facing trans women. She’s an excellent writer but even more so an incredibly brave, fierce advocate. Whether you are well versed in transgender issues or you do not feel you know much, this book is a fantastic and moving read. Pick it up!

Thank you for reading and recommending my book. I appreciate the care at which you embrace and shared it.
In love + words,
Janet

I read it a couple weeks ago and lived it :))) surprised it had taken me that long to get to.

janetmock:

exoticfever:

This post is the ninth in a series of posts I am making about books by black authors who impacted me. (The other posts are below). Today’s book is Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love and So Much More by Janet Mock. I read this memoir earlier this year when it came out.

Janet Mock is a transgender woman and was formerly a staff editor at People magazine. A beloved presence on Twitter and in media, she is a trans rights activist and thinker. The memoir is courageous, detailing her earliest memories of knowing she was a girl/woman and her process towards transition. She discusses her experience with survival sex work in both the book and in a series of videos she released on YouTube when the book came out. She’s challenged laws and policies that target and criminalize trans people, sex workers and people of color, and is a force to be reckoned with on Twitter and in the media.

Her story also charts difficult but loving relationships she has had with family members, and the challenges she faced in her love life. Reading about her relationship with her partner and his journey towards accepting his love for her is especially heartening and eye-opening. Some of my favorite media appearances with her have been on those occasions where she and Orange is the New Black actress Laverne Cox (a genius and badass in her own right) have been brought on to speak together. Mock regularly speaks at conferences and events, and started the #girlslikeus hashtag to elevate issues facing trans women. She’s an excellent writer but even more so an incredibly brave, fierce advocate. Whether you are well versed in transgender issues or you do not feel you know much, this book is a fantastic and moving read. Pick it up!

Thank you for reading and recommending my book. I appreciate the care at which you embrace and shared it.

In love + words,

Janet

I read it a couple weeks ago and lived it :))) surprised it had taken me that long to get to.

todayinhistory:

August 28th 1955: Emmett Till murdered

On this day in 1955, the 14-year-old African-American boy Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. While visiting family in the state, Till allegedly flirted with the young white shopkeeper Carolyn Bryant while buying candy. Bryant told her husband and a few nights later he and his half-brother abducted Till and brutally tortured and murdered him. His mutilated body was found three days later in the Tallahatchie river; Till’s face was unrecognisable, but he was identified by the ring he wore engraved with his father’s initials that his mother gave him before he left for Mississppi. The viciousness of this unprovoked, racially-motivated crime sent shockwaves throughout the nation. The case drew attention to the oppression of African-Americans throughout the nation and provided a name and a face to the threat of lynching. Till’s mother Mamie, a highly educated woman who went on to become a devoted fighter for African-American equality, insisted on an open-casket funeral in order to show the world what was done to her young son. Thousands attended the funeral and thousands more saw the horrific images of Till’s body. Due to the fierce reactions the murder had engendered it was a particularly painful, but sadly expected, outcome when the all-white jury in Mississippi acquitted Till’s killers, despite Till’s great-uncle openly identifying them in court. A few months later the killers, now protected by double jeopardy laws, sold their story to Look magazine and openly confessed to the murder in chilling detail. Taking place a year after the Supreme Court outlawed school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, the outrage over the murder galvanised the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. 100 days after Emmett Till’s murder Rosa Parks, on her way back from a rally for Till hosted by the then-unknown Martin Luther King Jr., refused to give up her seat for a white man on an Alabama bus. This sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, thus beginning the movement that would result in the dismantling of the system of Jim Crow segregation and win successes in promoting African-American social and political equality.

(via bustysaintclair)

politicalmachine:

it is important for feminist-minded men to actively analyze their own presence, words, and actions to ensure that they are not making the women around them feel uncomfortable or unsafe

(via suburbanwrath)

stupidstagram:

women are more likely than men to develop a mental illness but you rarely hear about women going on shooting sprees because men won’t be with us or love us or fuck us, bottom line, if you’re willing to relate mental illness and mass murder while also refusing to relate misogyny to women dying at the hands of men, then bye bye no time for you 

(Source: natnovna, via bustysaintclair)